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Wednesday, March 11, 2020

Supreme Court ALLOWS DHS To Continue 'REMAIN In MEXICO' Policy For ILLEGALS

Decision eases feds' fears of coronavirus vector

Central American immigrants hang around by the fence line of a shelter guarded by Mexican Federal police in riot gear in Piedras Negras, Mexico, Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019. A caravan of about 1,600 Central American migrants camped Tuesday in the Mexican border city of Piedras Negras, just west of Eagle Pass, Texas. The governor of the northern state of Coahuila described the migrants as "asylum seekers," suggesting all had express intentions of surrendering to U.S. authorities. (Jerry Lara/The San Antonio Express-News via AP) **FILE**
Central American immigrants hang around by the fence line of a shelter guarded by Mexican Federal police in riot gear in Piedras Negras, Mexico, Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019. A caravan of about 1,600 Central American migrants camped Tuesday in the Mexican border city of Piedras Negras, just west of Eagle Pass, Texas. The governor of the northern state of Coahuila described the migrants as "asylum seekers," suggesting all had express intentions of surrendering to U.S. authorities. (Jerry Lara/The San Antonio Express-News via AP) **FILE**



 Stephen Dinan

The Supreme Court granted a reprieve Wednesday for the Trump administration’s “Remain in Mexico” policy, preserving — for now — the key tool that allowed the government to solve last year’s border crisis.
The justices issued a stay on a lower court ruling that would have dissolved the policy, officially known as the Migrant Protection Protocol, in Arizona and California. The court said the stay would remain in place to give the administration time to argue its case before the high court.
That’s a major relief to Homeland Security officials, who’d feared a massive rush for the border should the MPP be erased.
That’s a particular concern at a time when coronavirus is spreading, with cases in Mexico and beyond, and people from more than 100 countries already arrested at the border so far this year.
“Without proper precautions, which can only happen through orderly, lawful migration, the virus threatens to spread rapidly,” an official told The Washington Times. “Any halting of MPP would exacerbate this threat.”
But immigrant-rights advocates criticized the justices, saying it’s leaving people fleeing violence in jeopardy in Mexico.
“The court of appeals unequivocally declared this policy to be illegal. The Supreme Court should as well,” said Judy Rabinovitz, a lawyer with the American Civil Liberties Union. “Asylum seekers face grave danger and irreversible harm every day this depraved policy remains in effect.”
The high court’s ruling is the latest in a string of decisions where the justices have rescued President Trump’s strict policies after lower courts ruled against him.
In this case, the decision was 8-1, with only Justice Sonia Sotomayor saying she would have refused the government’s request.
MPP allows the government to push migrants who show up at the southwestern border back across the line into Mexico to wait for their proceedings in American immigration courts.
Some 60,000 migrants have been returned to Mexico under the program.
Immigrant-rights advocates argue the policy is illegal and inhumane. They point to reports of migrants pushed back across the line who are victimized by gangs, kidnappers and smuggling cartels.
Homeland Security officials say migrants who follow the advice of officials and stay at shelters run by the Mexican government are safe.
U.S. officials also say MPP has played a critical role in stopping last year’s border surge, by denying migrants a foothold in the U.S.

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