theodore M I R A L D I mpa ... editor, publisher, writer

Sunday, May 31, 2020

Trump: U.S. to Designate ANTIFA as TERRORIST Organization

A protester wearing mask poses for photos in front of a fire during a protest over the death of George Floyd, a handcuffed black man in police custody in Minneapolis, in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)
A protester wearing mask poses for photos in front of a fire during a protest over the death of George Floyd, a handcuffed black man in police custody in Minneapolis, in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020.
 (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)



Tom Howell Jr. and Jeff Mordock

The U.S. will designate the “Antifa” group as a terrorist organization, President Trump said Sunday, as his administration blames the leftist organization for much of the violence at police-brutality protests across the country.
Mr. Trump announced his plan in a series of tweets about the ongoing unrest in multiple cities in the wake of George Floyd’s death. Mr. Floyd, a black man, died after a white officer kneeled on his neck area for nearly nine minutes during an arrest in Minneapolis.
The president has blamed far-left “militants” for the violence, including looting and fires, at the resulting protests, while Democratic voices say more investigation into white nationalist intervenors is warranted.
Groups like the American Civil Liberties Union immediately questioned Mr. Trump’s intentions, saying the terror designation is reserved for foreign entities and the label may be stretched for nefarious purposes.
“As this tweet demonstrates, terrorism is an inherently political label, easily abused and misused. There is no legal authority for designating a domestic group. Any such designation would raise significant due process and First Amendment concerns,” ACLU National Security Project Director Hina Shamsi said.
Mr. Trump hasn’t delivered an address to the nation on the protests, though he did speak about the situation at length after the SpaceX launch in Florida on Saturday.
He said the unrest is untenable and praised the National Guard for stepping in as he faults Democratic leaders for letting riots get out of control.
“Congratulations to our National Guard for the great job they did immediately upon arriving in Minneapolis, Minnesota, last night,” he tweeted. “The ANTIFA led anarchists, among others, were shut down quickly. Should have been done by Mayor on first night and there would have been no trouble!”
Attorney General William P. Barr hailed the decision, saying “outside radicals and agitators” are exploiting Mr. Floyd’s death for their own “violent and extremist agenda.”
Mr. Barr, the nation’s top cop, said he’s directed federal agents to apprehend and charge the “violent radical agitators who have hijacked peaceful protest.” He said more than 56 regional FBI Joint Terrorism Task Forces will work with state and local partners to identify lawbreakers.
“It is time to stop watching the violence and to confront and stop it,” he said. “The continued violence and destruction of property endangers the lives and livelihoods of others and interferes with the rights of peaceful protesters as well as other citizens.”

The Righteous RIOTERS

Colin Kaepernick offers to pay legal fees amid Minneapolis riots ...



theodore M I R A L D I.


One couldn't help but cringe at the sight of George Floyd's murder. And yes, some cops are Evil. Never lose sight though of all the good men and women who dress each day, leave their families, and never know whether they will return.

How unfortunate that exceptions to the norms nowadays get all the attention. Make no mistake, murder by a Police Officer is about egregious as it gets. And like others in authority, they should suffer the maximum penalty for their deeds, although this is a Democrat State, so don't hold your breath. Slow footed Officials who are used to allowing the status quo to prevail, have exacerbated
the violence taking place. 

Honoring the life of Charles Floyd with peaceful protests is how organized societies deal with problems such as this. Conflicted societies that enact and condone violence for political means aren't much better than the bad cops. What's become commonplace are the riots and destruction of property. And let's not forget those so righteous who have been threatening fines and jail to those working Americans whose businesses are being burned down to the ground. And by the way, no loud bursts of condemnation regarding social distancing either.

Like many other lexicons of modern society and the left, 'Righteousness' is now measured in Looting,
Rioting and Destruction of the Neighborhood. Complain about inequality and job opportunity and burn down the business that employs your neighbor. 

What comes to mind are primitive civilizations when at war, Burn, Loot, and Plunder their Enemies. I guess these misfits of society actually see us as the enemy. Not to be judgemental of my American fellowship, but this behavior is rooted in something far more complicated than social justice. This is what happens in Third World nations around the globe. The emotive outbursts that lead to criminal type behaviors. The lack of self-control, an opportunity to gain something you don't deserve. Not good characteristics to repeat after every perceived, or actual injustice. 

America's Heart goes out for George Floyd and his family. What's more painful than his death will be the added hatred others will have for their country and their community.

Eli Lake: Flynn's POLICY Differences with Obama a KEY BACKDROP to Russia Investigation

Eli Lake: Flynn's policy differences with Obama a key backdrop to ...



Charles Creitz

Bloomberg columnist Eli Lake joined "Life, Liberty & Levin" on Sunday to discuss the case of former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn.
Lake told host Mark Levin that the relationship between Flynn and former President Barack Obama was "very strained because Michael Flynn, when he was ... the director of the Defense Intelligence Agency [DIA], beginning in Obama's first term, he began pushing back against Obama's negotiations on the Iran nuclear deal."
Flynn spent two years as director of the DIA, leaving that position in August 2014.
Lake added that Flynn "was very skeptical of intelligence programs [aimed] to find what are known as moderate rebels in Syria to fight against the regime of Bashar al-Assad.
"He believed those so-called moderate rebels were really either going to collaborate or had collaborated with Al Qaeda, and in some cases, ISIS," Lake said. "And he became very skeptical of that."
After Flynn left the DIA, Lake said the now-retired Army lieutenant general may have ruffled feathers in Washington with a pair of interviews in which he expressed concerns about the Obama administration's Syria policy.
VIDEO
Lake went on to say that another point of contention between Obama and Flynn developed in the aftermath of the 2011 raid that killed Usama bin Laden. The columnist said Flynn was strongly concerned that Obama saw bin Laden's death as a good point to wind down the War on Terror.
"In that crucial period, if you remember back in 2013 and 2014, that really seemed to be the Obama administration's approach. And I think that Flynn thought that was a huge mistake," he said.
"So, all of these internal disagreements, I think, led to his premature ouster as the director of the Defense Intelligence Agency. And also meant that some of the traditional benefits for people who retire from the national security state at the level that Mike Flynn was, were not on offer for him," Lake further claimed.
According to Lake, Flynn was not given opportunities handed to other decorated retired generals, such as the chance to serve on corporate boards.
"In my view, that's not an excuse necessarily for some of the decisions he made with his own consulting group," he said. "But it's part of the way to explain some of that and what happened in this period before 2016."

Saturday, May 30, 2020

The TRUTH Behind RACIAL Disparities In FATAL Police Shootings


Joseph Cesario, associate professor of psychology at Michigan State University.













Caroline Brooks, Joseph Cesario


Reports of racially motivated, fatal shootings by police officers have garnered extensive public attention and sparked activism across the nation. New research from Michigan State University and University of Maryland reveals findings that flip many of these reports on their heads – white police officers are not more likely to have shot minority citizens than non-white officers.

“Until now, there’s never been a systematic, nationwide study to determine the characteristics of police involved in fatal officer-involved shootings,” said Joseph Cesario, co-author and professor of psychology at MSU. “There are so many examples of people saying that when black citizens are shot by police, it’s white officers shooting them. In fact, our findings show no support that black citizens are more likely to be shot by white officers."
The findings – published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, or PNAS – are based on an independent database Cesario and his team created that catalogued each police shooting from 2015. The team – led also by co-author David Johnson from University of Maryland – contacted every police department that had a fatal police shooting to get the race, sex and years of experience for every officer involved in each incident. The team also leveraged data from police shooting databases by The Washington Post and The Guardian.
“We found that the race of the officer doesn’t matter when it comes to predicting whether black or white citizens are shot," Cesario said. "If anything, black citizens are more likely to have been shot by black officers, but this is because black officers are drawn from the same population that they police. So, the more black citizens there are in a community, the more black police officers there are.”
The data show that it’s not racial bias on behalf of white officers relative to black officers when it comes to fatal shootings, and that’s good news. The bad news, Cesario said, is that internal policy changes, such as diversifying police forces, may not reduce shootings of minority citizens.
Beyond officer race, the team drew other conclusions about details related to racial disparities in fatal officer shootings.
“Many people ask whether black or white citizens are more likely to be shot and why. We found that violent crime rates are the driving force behind fatal shootings,” Cesario said. “Our data show that the rate of crime by each racial group correlates with the likelihood of citizens from that racial group being shot. If you live in a county that has a lot of white people committing crimes, white people are more likely to be shot. If you live in a county that has a lot of black people committing crimes, black people are more likely to be shot. It is the best predictor we have of fatal police shootings.”
By connecting the findings of police officer race, victim race and crime rates, the research suggests that the best way to understand police shootings isn’t racial bias of the police officer; rather, by the exposure to police officers through crime.
The vast majority – between 90% and 95% – of the civilians shot by officers were actively attacking police or other citizens when they were shot. Ninety percent also were armed with a weapon when they were shot. The horrific cases of accidental shootings, like mistaking a cell phone for a gun, are rare, Cesario said.
“We hear about the really horrendous and tragic cases of police shootings for a reason: they’re awful cases, they have major implications for police-community relations and so they should get attention,” Cesario said. “But, this ends up skewing perceptions about police shootings and leads people to believe that all fatal shootings are similar to the ones we hear about. That’s just not the case.”
One thing that was surprising to the researchers, Cesario said, were the number of mental health cases that resulted in fatal officer shootings.
“It was truly striking and we didn’t recognize just how many there were,” he said. “This shows how underappreciated mental health is in the national discussion of fatal officer shootings.”
Nearly 50% of all fatal shootings involving white civilians were because of mental health; it also accounted for nearly 20% of black civilians and 30% of Hispanics. These included two types of mental health cases: the first was “suicide by cop,” in which civilians intentionally antagonize the police because they want an officer to kill themselves; the second was a result of mental disorders, such as when a civilian is suffering from schizophrenia and poses a threat to officers.
Although white officers are not more likely than black officers to shoot black citizens when looking at all fatal shootings, the data are too uncertain to draw firm conclusions once different subtypes of shootings, such as shootings of unarmed citizens, are examined. This is because these types of shootings are too rare for strong conclusions to be drawn.
Cesario said that better record keeping – such as the FBI's National Use-of-Force Data Collection, which launched in 2019 – will enable researchers to understand police shootings in finer detail.
Hear more from Cesario on the Manifold podcast.
(Note for media: Please include a link to the original paper in online coverage: https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2019/07/16/1903856116)

Twitter And Social Media Are A CANCER On Our CIVIC Life. They Don’t Deserve Protection

The debate about whether social media companies should have protection from liability misses a larger question about their role in American society.




John Daniel Davidson

There’s nothing like a row between Twitter and President Trump to turn everyone into an expert on 47 U.S. Code § 230, a heretofore obscure section of federal law that deals with liability protections for companies like Twitter.

Go on social media right now and you’re bound to find friends, neighbors, and colleagues opining on federal statutes and citing old Supreme Court cases to bolster their arguments that we have to do this or that right now to save the internet or protect free speech.

So let me just say up front, I am not an expert on Section 230 or on federal liability law generally. I don’t have a strong opinion on exactly how the law should be reformed or what the mechanisms of a successful reform might be, nor do I think there aren’t real trade-offs to consider here.

But I don’t need to be an expert in liability law to know this: social media are corrosive to our civic life, and social media companies like Twitter are largely unaccountable for their actions in that regard. Without question, Twitter and Facebook and YouTube have harmed democratic life in America, eroded our civic values, and exacerbated divisions and distrust between citizens. If they all disappeared tomorrow, the country would be better off.

Consider for a moment the disconnect between what social media promised us and what we actually got. The big idea was that making everyone more connected virtually would bring us closer together in reality, that a digital commons would increase empathy and build real community.

Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg made this sentiment a kind of mantra. When he took his company public in 2012, he was clear about the social mission behind the enterprise. “We are extending people’s capacity to build and maintain relationships,” he wrote, adding that, “Facebook exists to make the world more open and connected, and not just to build a company.”

It hasn’t worked out that way, or at least not quite in the way Zuckerberg meant. The world is undoubtedly more open and connected thanks to Facebook and Twitter, but it is not more sanguine or tolerant or kind. Connectedness through social media has not made us more empathetic or willing to change our minds, and it has not brought us closer together.

Just the opposite, in fact. Even setting aside the online ugliness of the 2016 election, is there any conflict or tension in American society that isn’t made worse by social media? Sure, there are rare exceptions—sometimes people do nice things for each other, sometimes people use these platforms to reunite with long lost family members or friends. But the dominant emotion of social media is anger, the default tone is caustic, and the overall effect is division.



Delete The Comment Section

Obviously, not everyone shares this view. Many people think the advent of the internet and the inventions of mass platforms like Facebook and Twitter meant we had to make concessions in federal law to enable these companies to host third-party content without the fear of defamation lawsuits over what their users might post. (For some background on how we got Section 230, check out Eugene Volokh’s helpful primer at Reason.)

Rolling back or reforming these liability protections isn’t so easy, were told. And besides, such drastic reform might not even be necessary. After all, companies like Twitter have no obligation under federal law to be neutral in how they police content posted on their platforms.

My friend David Harsanyi makes this point at NRO, rightly noting that newspapers and magazines with online comment sections enjoy the same liability protections under Section 230 that Twitter does. An outlet like the New York Times is liable for what it publishes or commissions but not for what online commenters write.

“In the same way,” writes Harsanyi, “if Twitter ‘factchecks’ a user, its opinion should be considered published material that is no longer protected from liability. By offering one opinion, Twitter isn’t suddenly liable for the billions of other tweets that exist on its site, or for the opinion held in the tweet to which it is responding.”

It’s a fair point, but it misses a larger problem. Why should Twitter or Facebook or YouTube be given liability protections at all? Why should it be the case that these companies can host all manner of content, make a fortune, and not be expected to bear responsibility for any of it?

Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act was passed in 1996, back when Congress was grappling with new technology and trying to make the internet as open as possible. Harsanyi and others worry that if liability protections are taken away, there would be a flood of lawsuits. Media companies might abandon open platforms altogether. Social media as we know it might cease to exist.

Let’s hope so. It wouldn’t be the end of the world—or even of free speech—if we went back to an Internet without comment sections, without Twitter mobs, and without aggressively politicized social media companies.

And anyway, in all likelihood we wouldn’t go backward but forward. New kinds of platforms and new methods of communications would emerge, maybe a more diverse array of companies, too. Somewhere along the way, someone might even devise a social media platform that doesn’t incessantly turn us against one another and stoke division and civic unrest.

The future is uncertain, but the present state of affairs is not. Let’s admit what we all know: Twitter and the other tech giants are a cancer on our body politick. We owe them nothing, certainly not special protection from liability. Let them figure out how to operate like the traditional publishers they have decided to be—and if they can’t, let them die.

Source>https://thefederalist.com/2020/05/30/twitter-and-social-media-are-a-cancer-on-our-civic-life-they-dont-deserve-protection/

Joe Biden's RACISM a Democratic Party Tradition

Biden has a long history of being racially insensitive

Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden said Tuesday, May 27, 2020, that he responded "in kind" to radio host Charlamagne tha God when he made the controversial "you ain't black" remark last week on "The Breakfast Club." (screengrab via CNN)
Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden said Tuesday, May 27, 2020, that he responded “in kind” to radio host Charlamagne tha God when he made the controversial “you ain’t black” remark last week on
 “The Breakfast Club.” (screengrab via CNN)



 Charles Hurt

True, we have not even elected him president yet, but isn’t it already time to start dismantling Joe Biden’s presidential library?
After all, he has a long history of supporting white supremacists and just being an all-around racially insensitive, privileged white geezer.
To be fair, Mr. Biden did not invent the Democratic Party or its racism. But for nearly 50 years he has knowingly and willingly associated himself with and supported the causes of the Democratic Party, known throughout history for its association with white supremacy.
Just this week, The New York Times “celebrated” Memorial Day the only way they know how. They wrote an editorial denigrating the U.S. military and disparaging a bunch of military figures who have been highly revered throughout history for their leadership in the U.S. military.
In the process, apparently, The New York Times editorial board made a shocking discovery that America fought a civil war back in the 1860s called, well, the “Civil War.” It is also known in some parts as the “War Between the States,” the “War of Northern Aggression,” the “Late Unpleasantness,” and, even still, sometimes just “The War.”
These same crack editorial page writers also, in the process of discovering this civil war, discovered that for hundreds of years the abominable practice of slavery was legal in the United States. It was legal, in fact, until a Republican president named Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 and pushed through the 13th Amendment in 1865.
“Why Does the U.S. Military Celebrate White Supremacists?” asks The New York Times editorial board.
This is a fairly hilarious question that reveals more about The New York Times editorial board than anything about the U.S. military. Anyone in America with even the most passing affiliation with the U.S. armed services knows that the American military is — without equal — the most egalitarian institution in the country.
Military service has been a pathway to the American dream for millions of Americans, regardless of income, gender, race or religious beliefs. The fact that The New York Times editorial board does not know this tells you all you need to know about them.
As the U.S. military was helping millions make leaps and bounds towards the American Dream, Democrat Joe Biden was busy kibitzing with actual white supremacists. And we are not just talking about former Sen. Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia, who was an “Exalted Cyclops” in the Ku Klux Klan before becoming the longest-serving senator in U.S. history. Both lifelong Democrats, Mr. Biden and Mr. Byrd served in the Senate together and caucused together for more than 35 years.
But wait there’s more!
Just last year, Mr. Biden bragged how well he worked with other fierce segregationists in his own party.
So enthusiastic is Mr. Biden about his fond memories of working with the ol’ time racists that whenever he waxes poetic about them, he slips into a fake Southern accent.
At a fundraiser last year, Mr. Biden recalled warmly — in a fake Southern accent — how one of the old racist bulls “never called me ‘boy.’ He always called me ‘son.’”
This is how Mr. Biden always talks when channeling his party’s long, ugly history with racism and racist politics.
In 2012, the last time he was fighting for his political life, Mr. Biden donned a fake Southern accent when he bizarrely warned a gathering of black voters in rural Virginia that his opponent would “put y’all back in chains” if elected.
It’s the same fake Southern accent he used last week when he told black voters that they “ain’t black” if they have any second thoughts about voting for him to be president.
While The New York Times editorial board is busy dishonorably smearing the U.S. military today, they would be far more effective if they trained their vitriol on the Democratic nominee for president and the future monument to his long career in Washington.
Or, as Ronald Reagan might have said, “Mr. Biden, tear down that library!”

Dan Bongino: Protest Agitators 'READY TO BURN YOUR CITY DOWN' Should Be Charged As Domestic TERRORISTS

Dan Bongino: Protest agitators 'ready to burn your city down ...


Julia Musto

Riot organizers and agitators with the pre-meditated purpose of chaos and destruction of property should be charged as domestic terrorists,  former NYPD officer and Secret Service agent Dan Bongino argued Saturday.
In an interview on "Fox & Friends Weekend" with hosts Griff Jenkins, Pete Hegseth, and Jedidiah Bila, Bongino argued that individuals who show up to protests with the purpose of rioting, with chemical incendiary devices "ready to burn your city down," can no longer be called protesters.
"These are not protesters; these are domestic terrorists. They are showing up with weapons specifically designed to fracture glass and windows, to then go walk in, loot the place, place a chemical incendiary device, and burn your city to the ground," he stated.
"They are no different than Al Qaeda terrorists. That's what these people are. They are terrorists. They use violence, disruption, chaos, theft, and the potential of death," Bongino told the "Friends Weekend" hosts.
Bongino cited the death of a federal officer in Oakland.on Friday night. Nearly 10,000 people took to the streets of the East Bay city, at one point stopping traffic, looting stores like Target and Walgreens, and setting fire to a Chase bank.
"These people should be tracked down, video should be used, and...if it takes two years, three years, or five years, anyone involved in this -- again, I'm a constitutionalist, your right to assemble is always a big “R” God-given right and should be protected -- but if you showed up with an incendiary device to burn someone's business down, with weapons to destroy people and property, then you should be tracked down to the end of this Earth," he remarked.
"And, you should do time in jail - not for disorderly conduct where you get out in a day, but for a conspiracy charge to commit terror," Bongingo concluded. "And, you should go to jail for a long time and maybe that'll send a message."

Minnesota Governor Authorizes 'FULL MOBILIZATION' of State's National Guard, Says Protests No Longer About Death of George Floyd




Barnini Chakraborty, Dom Calicchio



Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz announced Saturday he has authorized "full mobilization" of the state's National Guard -something that has never been done in the 164-year history of the Minnesota National Guard.
Walz, who has been hammered by residents, critics and the press for his response to the crisis in his state, pushed back on the idea that the protests, which have turned increasingly violent, now have anything to do with George Floyd, an unarmed black man in Minneapolis killed by white police officer Derek Chauvin.
"The tactics and the approach that we have taken have evolved and need to evolve the same way, with a sensitivity to the legitimate rage and anger that came after what the world witnessed in the murder of George Floyd and was manifested in a very healthy gathering of community to memorialize that Tuesday night, which was still present to a certain degree on Wednesday," he said, adding, "By Thursday it was nearly gone and last night is a mockery of pretending this is about George Floyd's death or inequities or historical traumas to our communities of color." 
During his Saturday morning press conference Walz also thanked first responders "who are out there protecting our cities."
"As they were taking incoming fire, improvised explosive devices and a highly evolved and tightly-controlled group of folks bent on adapting their tactics to make it as difficult as possible to maintain that order," he said.
Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey added that most of the violent protesters aren't residents of the city but instead people taking advantage of a situation and hellbent on fanning the flames of hate.
Demonstrators kneel before police Saturday, May 30, 2020, in Minneapolis. Protests continued following the death of George Floyd, who died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers on Memorial Day.
Demonstrators kneel before police Saturday, May 30, 2020, in Minneapolis. Protests continued following the death of George Floyd, who died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers on Memorial Day. (AP)
"This is no longer about protesting," Frey said.  "... This is about violence and we need to make sure that it stops."
Both leaders have implied that organized outsiders, including but not limited to anarchists, white supremacists and gangs from other states, were behind the destruction and chaos in Minneapolis.
“The sheer number of rioters has made it impossible to make coherent arrests... The capacity to be able to do offensive action was greatly diminished” by the sheer scope and seemingly organized nature of the assaults," Walz said.
“The terrifying thing is that this resembles more a military operation now as you observe ringleaders moving from place to place,” he added.
Protesters skirmish with the National Guard near the 3rd Precinct before heading down Lake St. towards the 5th Precinct in Minneapolis, Minn., Friday, May 29, 2020. 
Protesters skirmish with the National Guard near the 3rd Precinct before heading down Lake St. towards the 5th Precinct in Minneapolis, Minn., Friday, May 29, 2020.  (Richard Tsong-Taatarii/Star Tribune via AP)
Fed up residents and local businesses that have been looted and set on fire hope the city will see some calm with the arrival of the National Guard.
Minnesota's National Guard is comprised of more than 13,000 soldiers, according to the Guard's 2019 annual report.
Reinforcements from the active-duty forces could also be on the way soon. Military police units have been put on alert. Fox News can confirm at least one unit out of Fort Drum, New York home to the U.S. Army's 10th Mountain Division has been told to be ready to deploy in 4-hours if needed.
The 10th Mountain is part of the Army’s 18th Airborne Corps, which always keeps a brigade on alert ready to deploy overseas on short notice.  An alert brigade from the 82nd Airborne Division was recently deployed on short notice to the Middle East in early January after the attack on the U.S. embassy in Baghdad.
In this May 29, 2020, photo, a check-cashing business burns during protests in Minneapolis. Protests continued following the death of George Floyd, who died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers on Memorial Day. 
In this May 29, 2020, photo, a check-cashing business burns during protests in Minneapolis. Protests continued following the death of George Floyd, who died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers on Memorial Day.  (AP)
Some officials say it’s not a coincidence its soldiers from Fort Bragg and Fort Drum, first reported by the Associated Press, which have been put on alert.  Some of these soldiers are already on alert as part of the 18th Airborne Corps, which rotates an alert brigade of roughly 4,000 soldiers.
Military Police units could be used to back up law enforcement in Minnesota, but no orders have been given to deploy, officials tell Fox News.
Deploying active-duty forces in not without precedent inside the United States. In 1992, thousands of active-duty forces were dispatched to Los Angeles during the Rodney King riots under the Insurrection Act of 1807.
Police clear the street for firefighters during protests Friday, May 29, 2020, in Minneapolis. Protests continued following the death of George Floyd, who died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers on Memorial Day. 
Police clear the street for firefighters during protests Friday, May 29, 2020, in Minneapolis. Protests continued following the death of George Floyd, who died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers on Memorial Day.  (AP)
Floyd’s death Monday – for which four Minneapolis police officers were fired Tuesday and one of them, Gauvin, was arrested and charged with third-degree murder Friday – has sparked protests and rioting across the U.S., from New York City and Washington, D.C., to Chicago; Columbus, Ohio, Louisville, Ky., and Dallas, to San Jose, Calif.; Los Angeles and Portland, Ore.
“The arrest of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin for the brutal killing of George Floyd is a welcome but overdue step on the road to justice,” Floyd family attorney Ben Crump said Friday, according to FOX 9. “We expected a first-degree murder charge. We want a first-degree murder charge. And we want to see the other officers arrested.”
This photo provided by the Ramsey County Sheriff's Office shows former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin, who was arrested Friday in the Memorial Day death of George Floyd. (Ramsey County Sheriff's Office via AP)
This photo provided by the Ramsey County Sheriff's Office shows former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin, who was arrested Friday in the Memorial Day death of George Floyd. (Ramsey County Sheriff's Office via AP)
Meantime, all across the nation came reports of arson fires, looting and smashed windows and vehicles. From some cities came reports of gunfire against police officers.
And all of it happened as the nation continues to grapple with the coronavirus pandemic, which has killed more than 100,000 Americans.
In Portland, Ore., a crowd smashed windows and sparked a fire inside the city’s Justice Center, FOX 12 of Oregon reported.
In San Jose, police officers fired on an SUV that struck at least two people, according to the Mercury News.
“The whole crowd started chasing the car but it got away,” Saul Duarte, a protester who recorded the incident on video, told the newspaper. “After that, everyone surrounded the two injured people and tried helping but the cops started tear-gassing us.”
WARNING: GRAPHIC IMAGES
In Oakland, Calif., police said several officers were injured by projectiles, FOX 2 of the Bay Area reported.
Bystanders also reported being injured.
“I got punched in the face and my cell phone was taken,” one motorist told FOX 2.
In Detroit, Michigan, one man was killed and dozens more arrested. The shooting occurred near a large protest at Cadillac Square when someone in a gray Dodge Durango fired shots into the crowd, hitting a 19-year-old, according to police, per The Detroit News.
In New York, rioters torched a police van and NYPD officers reported hundreds of arrests, The New York Post reported.
A police van goes up in flames in New York City. 
A police van goes up in flames in New York City. 
In Washington, the White House was briefly placed on lockdown as crowds reached a boiling point, FOX 5 of DC reported.
In Atlanta, a crowd stormed the entrance to CNN headquarters, at one point climbing onto the TV network’s logo outside the building.
Demonstrators paint on the CNN logo during a protest, Friday, May 29, 2020, in Atlanta, in response to the death of George Floyd in police custody on Memorial Day in Minneapolis. (Associated Press)
Demonstrators paint on the CNN logo during a protest, Friday, May 29, 2020, in Atlanta, in response to the death of George Floyd in police custody on Memorial Day in Minneapolis. (Associated Press)
Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms issued an impassioned plea for rioters to stop their violence and simply go home.
"What I see happening in the streets of Atlanta is not Atlanta,” Bottoms said, according to FOX 5 Atlanta. “This is not a protest. This is not in the spirit of Martin Luther King Jr. This is chaos. A protest has purpose.”
"What I see happening in the streets of Atlanta is not Atlanta. This is not a protest. This is not in the spirit of Martin Luther King Jr. This is chaos. A protest has purpose.”
— Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms
In Chicago, demonstrators shut down streets in the Loop, many of them chanting, “I can’t breathe,” which Floyd was heard saying on a video that went viral, showing a police officer kneeling on his neck, FOX 32 reported.
Early Saturday, Chicago police were deployed to the Trump International Hotel and Tower, where a crowd had gathered.
Video posted on social media showed people lying on the ground after apparently being struck by objects.
Hundreds of protesters filled the streets in Louisville, where they demonstrated for a second night not only against Floyd’s death but against the death of Breonna Taylor, an emergency room technician who was killed by a police officer in her home on March 13.
Police used tear gas against the crowd, FOX affiliate WDRB-TV reported.
"This has been a very sad night for our city," Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer told reporters just after 1 a.m. Saturday. “There needs to be ample recognition of the underlying inequity that causes so much of this frustration, but there is no excuse for the destruction of property we have seen this evening. This is not protest; it is violence.”
"There is no excuse for the destruction of property we have seen this evening. This is not protest; it is violence."
— Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer
Although fired Minneapolis Chauvin has been arrested and charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter in connection with Floyd’s death, the three other officers who were fired in connection with the case have not been charged with any crimes – and it remained unclear when the protests and rioting would end.
Fox News' Lucas Tomlinson and The Associated Press contributed to this story.